When you are writing an ebook a big question that often comes to mind is, “How much can I charge for my ebook? What is my likely audience going to pay?” This is a difficult question to answer and you may wish to go ahead and test out your ebook at different price points to find out. Within this article, I’m going to suggest some common pricing points and when you might choose to sell your ebook for each one of those.

The first option is to sell your ebook for absolutely nothing, or in other words to give your ebook away. This could be a very profitable strategy even if it may not at first seem to be the case. By giving your ebook away you can instead look to make money in different ways. For instance, you can add affiliate links within the ebook on which you’re going to make a commission every time. If you can get this ebook into the hands of a large number of people, you can stand to make substantially more by giving it away then you would by selling it. Often free ebooks are quite short. You may be looking at 10 pages or less. And this is acceptable to people. After all they haven’t paid to get this ebook from you.

A $7 price point is very common for ebooks. And this dates back to a large amount of testing done on the internet which said that $7 or any number ending in seven is a hot seller on the internet. A $7 price has lively stuck for ebooks and seems to compare well with physical sales in that price range. Another reason the $7 price range started is due to a script called the $7 Script and what happened there is people would let other people from out their ebook for $7, but it wouldn’t be sold for the script. As a writer of the ebook you’re not necessarily getting any money for this, but you would benefit from getting an email address of a purchaser who you could then sell to later on.

A $7 price range tends to be good for ebooks or a relatively low number of pages with more than the free equivalent, say 20 to 30 pages. You can get a good amount of information to directly solve a problem within that short space or you can save your largest branch of information for the more expensive price ranges.

When you move on to the $27 and above range, you’re expecting to be providing a substantial ebook and this should always be the case. For a $27 price range, unless you providing the most exclusive information in the world, you should probably be looking for at least 40 pages and often substantially more. And this information is to be of value to your reader. The good thing about a $27 ebook is you don’t need to sell anywhere near as many copies as the $7 ebook in order to make a certain amount of income. In fact, you need to sell less than a quarter of the number of copies. So if you can put together the right information and market it in the right way, you can have a lot of success with the $27 ebook.

Realistically, the prices you should be charging for an ebook depends on what your long-term aims are for the niche you’re working in. If you’re really interested in building a list, than you need to be getting them through a free ebook or perhaps through a $7 ebook which they feel they can invest in at a relatively risk free status. Once you go up to the $27 market point for an ebook, you need to be finding much more substantial or immediately implacable information.

If you follow these instructions, you can soon choose an appropriate price for your ebook.

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